Meizu Pro 5 is the first Ubuntu phone that’s also a desktop PC

The Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone features a Samsung Exynos 7420 octa-core processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and a 5.7 inch full HD AMOLED display. When it launched earlier this year, it was the most powerful smartphone to ship with Ubuntu’s smartphone-friendly operating system to date.
Now it’s also the first Ubuntu phone that you can also use as a desktop computer.
Canonical has released a software update called OTA-11 for Ubuntu phones and tablets. One of the key features is support for connecting an external display using the Miracast wireless display protocol.
Ubuntu for phones and tablets supports a feature called “convergence” which lets you interact with a desktop-style user interface when you’re using a keyboard, mouse, and external display. Now that the mobile version of Ubuntu supports wireless displays though, you don’t need a video port anymore. Just use a Miracast wireless display dongle to connect the phone to a monitor, connect a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse, and you’re good to go.

Source: http://liliputing.com/2016/06/meizu-pro-5-first-ubuntu-phone-thats-also-desktop-pc-thanks-ota-11-update.html
Submitted by: Arnfried Walbrecht


All articles

Microsoft launches meeting app Invite for iPhone, coming soon to Android and Windows Phone

Microsoft today launched a new standalone app for scheduling meetings called Invite. Available only for iPhone users in the U.S. and Canada for now, you can download Invite now directly from Apple’s App Store.

Here is how it works. First you suggest times that work for you, and then invite attendees to vote. You can send invites to anyone with an email address — even if they are outside your organization. The recipients select all the times they can attend from the app itself or from a browser, once votes are in, you pick the time that works best.

The best part is that anyone invited can see what options work best for other attendees, and suggest their own times as well. The sender chooses a final date and time whenever they’re ready, hitting Send Calendar Invites to get it on everyone’s calendars.

Here is how Microsoft explains its thinking behind the app:

Invite is designed to overcome the biggest obstacle when scheduling meetings — not being able to see the calendars of attendees outside your organization. As a result, your proposed meeting can be repeatedly declined until you find a time that works.

From VentureBeat

Location, location, location — Not using geolocation to reach your mobile customers? Your competitors are. Find out what you’re missing.

Certain events and meetings can be moved if something more important comes up, but only each person knows best where they are flexible. By letting attendees pick times that work for them, even when it means moving one of their own meetings, can stop that meeting from being scheduled on a Friday evening.

Invite is mainly designed for users with Office 365 business and school accounts. That said, the app also works with any email account, including Outlook.com, Gmail, and Yahoo Mail.

The app’s launch and limitations are very similar to Microsoft’s Send, a lightweight email app that debuted in July. Like Send, Invite is starting out as iPhone-only, available only in two countries, and with the promise of “coming soon” to Android and Windows Phone.

Invite is the latest in a long line of apps to emerge from Microsoft Garage, the software giant’s lab for experimental tinkering. At this rate, Microsoft will soon have more experimental apps than “final” apps.

And that’s okay, as long as some of them are eventually released or integrated into existing products.

More information:

Powered by VBProfiles



RSS-3