Online gaming may boost school scores. Social media? Not so much.

If you or your kids are avid gamers, here’s some good news: All that strategising may have a beneficial impact on school results. Whether regular Facebook use is a drag on one’s English test scores — that’s another question.

A study conducted by Alberto Posso, a professor at Australia’s RMIT University, found that teenagers who played online video games regularly were often able to improve their school scores. 

Students who were daily social media users, however, tended to under perform in maths, reading and science. “The results suggest that a student who uses online social networks on a daily basis will also obtain a grade in math that is 20 points lower than a student who never uses this type of social media,” Posso said in the report. Read more…

More about Social Media, Science, School, Online Gaming, and Australia


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ESPN’s new online ads let businesses focus on your favorite teams

Visit ESPN’s website after your team scores a big victory, and you may start seeing ads congratulating them on the win. 

Meanwhile, that same advertiser could be simultaneously mourning the opposing team’s loss to appease its disappointed fans.

ESPN just rolled out a new tool that lets advertisers place personalized ads based on what it knows about visitors’ favorite teams and players and the outcomes of particular games.

Brands can even build an advertisement around an exciting moment in a game — say, a far-out three-pointer from Steph Curry that has social media abuzz — then target it at fans of Curry or the Golden State Warriors for a set window of time afterwards. Read more…

More about Ads, Upfronts 2016, Upfronts, Espn, and Business


Cloud Computing

This couple can’t do the simplest things online because their last name is ‘Null’


Having a funny name can sometimes be unfortunate, but one couple is finding it pretty difficult to do anything online because of theirs. Jennifer Null (and her husband, who warned her it would be a bumpy ride when she took his last name) have trouble booking flights, accessing the IRS website and setting up utilities; just about anything that requires a real name. The problem is their last name, which — when entered into forms — tricks the database into thinking nothing had been entered. ‘Null’ is a word to indicate there is no value, so the program thinks they’re both trying to go…

This story continues at The Next Web


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